Integrative Healthcare Symposium

Environmental Influences on Health: Research, Preventions and Treatment Strategies

February 20, 2015 NYC

Susan Luck, Moderator

Panelists: Robert Rountree MD, Walter Crinnion ND, and Devra Davis PhD

EarthRose Quarterly Newsletter Fall 2014

Breast Cancer Awareness is Every Month

As pink ribbons and fundraisers escalate to raise awareness aroung the breast cancer "epidemic" this month, finding the "cure" has become a comforting concept... (more) 

ADVOCACY & ACTION:

Environmental Health and Prevention Strategies

An Overview of Environmental Health and Prevention Strategies - Choose your food wisely- eat as organically as possible, and limit animal fats as endocrine disruptors and heavy metals accumulate in the food chain. The higher your animal protein source, the greater the potential toxics load...   (more)

Big News!

Campaign for Safe Cosmetics 

Johnson & Johnson, makers of Aveeno, Neutrogena, ROC, Clean & Clear, Purpose and Johnson's Baby Shampoo, to agree to phase out chemicals that can cause cancer and harm our health from its baby AND adult products in 57 countries around the world!  (more) 

The Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals Exposure Elimination Act of 2011 
The Act addresses one of the most serious threats to the security and economy of our country: the health and well-being of our children... 
(more)

Healing the Planet: The Bigger Picture 
The Story of Stuff

The Story of Cosmetics

Breast Cancer - The Estrogen Connection 
Videos from the Program on Breast Cancer and Environmental Risk Factors - Cornell University 

 

Children's Health & the Environment

$76B in Pediatric Healthcare Costs Linked to Environmental Factors 
Diseases in children caused by environmental contaminants - many of them preventable - cost an estimated $76.6 billion in 2008, according to a report in today's edition of the journal  Health Affairs.   (more) 

Children's Health: Better Regulation Of Toxic Chemicals 
The American Academy of Pediatrics is calling for an overhaul of the nation's chemical management policy, saying the existing system fails to protect children and pregnant women, who are most vulnerable   (more)

 
Exposure: Environmental Links to Breast Cancer       
Are your Cleaning Products Safe? 
What's Hiding in Your Cleaning Products? - a report by Women's Voices for the Earth. 

Is Susan G. Komen Denying the BPA-Breast Caner Link?  (see article) 

A Healing Garden Grows in Bhopal 
The Sambhavna Trust Clinic provides free medical care to survivors of the December 1984 Union Carbide disaster in Bhopal.

The Disappearing Male - CBC Documentary 
"We are conducting a vast toxicological experiment in which our children and our children's children are the experimental subjects." 
Dr. Herbert Needleman 

The Disappearing Male is about one of the most important, and least publicized, issues facing the human species: the toxic threat to the male reproductive system. 
Click here to view the CBC documentary 

Parents, Doctors, Nurses to Johnson & Johnson: Make Safer Baby Products

Concerned about cancer-causing chemicals, more than 40 organizations representing 1.7 million parents, health care providers and environmental health advocates delivered a letter today to Johnson & Johnson (NYSE: JNJ) urging the company to remove toxic ingredients from its popular baby products.  (more) 

Victory for Safer Baby Products

"On Monday, November 1st, 2011, the campaign sent Johnson & Johnson a letter, signed by about 25 environmental, medical and other groups representing about 3.5 million people in the U.S. and other countries. It urges the company to publicly commit by Nov. 15 to removing the chemicals from all personal care products worldwide." - Associated Press

Through meetings, letters, calls and grassroots mobilization, we've been pushing Johnson & Johnson for safer baby products for more than two years, and this week the company answered. In response to our report, Baby's Tub Is Still Toxic, J&J released a statement saying it's phasing two carcinogenic chemicals out of its baby products worldwide: formaldehyde-releasing preservatives and 1,4-dioxane. 

Women's EHN News

© EnvironmentalHealthNews 2003-2004

Warning: That tan could be hazardous. Indoor tanning might seem like a fashion that faded with the 1980s, but it remains a persistent part of American adolescence, popular spring, summer and fall but especially in winter, when bodies are palest. Salons with names like Eternal Summer and Tan City dot strip malls across the country, promising prettiness and, in some cases, better health, despite a growing body of evidence that links indoor tanning to skin cancer.

Which food companies don't use BPA-lined cans? There are many reasons to be concerned about the chemical bisphenol-A or BPA. The Food and Drug Administration says BPA is safe low levels, but other countries take a more cautious approach: Austria, Denmark, Belgium, France and China limit the chemical's contact with food. The FDA continues to study the issue. In response, several companies have removed BPA from their cans, and others have moved away from using it in the cans of specific foods. Here's a list of national brands that produce canned foods that do no have BPA in the lining:

Real American Idols. In the past year, we've lost four science and environment icons whose impact will be felt for decades.

Beauty products aim to prevent air pollution damage. Many people want younger looking skin and one of the ways to do that includes protecting it from sun damage, but now a slew of products are also claiming to protect skin from pollutants in the air.

Lung cancer rates in Welsh women increase by a third. The number of women in Wales with lung cancer has jumped by 35 per cent over the last decade and the country now has one of the highest rates in Europe, according to a report.

Ad banned over claim sunbeds don't raise cancer risk. A Scottish chain of tanning salons has been banned from producing adverts claiming there is no link between sunbeds and skin cancer.

Turkey's president accuses advocates of birth control of being traitors. He has called women unequal to men. He has demanded that some high school students learn an Ottoman-era script scrapped nearly a century ago. Now, he has described birth control as treasonous.

© EnvironmentalHealthNews 2003-2004

Warning: That tan could be hazardous. Indoor tanning might seem like a fashion that faded with the 1980s, but it remains a persistent part of American adolescence, popular spring, summer and fall but especially in winter, when bodies are palest. Salons with names like Eternal Summer and Tan City dot strip malls across the country, promising prettiness and, in some cases, better health, despite a growing body of evidence that links indoor tanning to skin cancer.

Which food companies don't use BPA-lined cans? There are many reasons to be concerned about the chemical bisphenol-A or BPA. The Food and Drug Administration says BPA is safe low levels, but other countries take a more cautious approach: Austria, Denmark, Belgium, France and China limit the chemical's contact with food. The FDA continues to study the issue. In response, several companies have removed BPA from their cans, and others have moved away from using it in the cans of specific foods. Here's a list of national brands that produce canned foods that do no have BPA in the lining:

Real American Idols. In the past year, we've lost four science and environment icons whose impact will be felt for decades.

Beauty products aim to prevent air pollution damage. Many people want younger looking skin and one of the ways to do that includes protecting it from sun damage, but now a slew of products are also claiming to protect skin from pollutants in the air.

Lung cancer rates in Welsh women increase by a third. The number of women in Wales with lung cancer has jumped by 35 per cent over the last decade and the country now has one of the highest rates in Europe, according to a report.

Ad banned over claim sunbeds don't raise cancer risk. A Scottish chain of tanning salons has been banned from producing adverts claiming there is no link between sunbeds and skin cancer.

Turkey's president accuses advocates of birth control of being traitors. He has called women unequal to men. He has demanded that some high school students learn an Ottoman-era script scrapped nearly a century ago. Now, he has described birth control as treasonous.

© EnvironmentalHealthNews 2003-2004

Warning: That tan could be hazardous. Indoor tanning might seem like a fashion that faded with the 1980s, but it remains a persistent part of American adolescence, popular spring, summer and fall but especially in winter, when bodies are palest. Salons with names like Eternal Summer and Tan City dot strip malls across the country, promising prettiness and, in some cases, better health, despite a growing body of evidence that links indoor tanning to skin cancer.

Which food companies don't use BPA-lined cans? There are many reasons to be concerned about the chemical bisphenol-A or BPA. The Food and Drug Administration says BPA is safe low levels, but other countries take a more cautious approach: Austria, Denmark, Belgium, France and China limit the chemical's contact with food. The FDA continues to study the issue. In response, several companies have removed BPA from their cans, and others have moved away from using it in the cans of specific foods. Here's a list of national brands that produce canned foods that do no have BPA in the lining:

Real American Idols. In the past year, we've lost four science and environment icons whose impact will be felt for decades.

Beauty products aim to prevent air pollution damage. Many people want younger looking skin and one of the ways to do that includes protecting it from sun damage, but now a slew of products are also claiming to protect skin from pollutants in the air.

Lung cancer rates in Welsh women increase by a third. The number of women in Wales with lung cancer has jumped by 35 per cent over the last decade and the country now has one of the highest rates in Europe, according to a report.

Ad banned over claim sunbeds don't raise cancer risk. A Scottish chain of tanning salons has been banned from producing adverts claiming there is no link between sunbeds and skin cancer.

Turkey's president accuses advocates of birth control of being traitors. He has called women unequal to men. He has demanded that some high school students learn an Ottoman-era script scrapped nearly a century ago. Now, he has described birth control as treasonous.

© EnvironmentalHealthNews 2003-2004

Warning: That tan could be hazardous. Indoor tanning might seem like a fashion that faded with the 1980s, but it remains a persistent part of American adolescence, popular spring, summer and fall but especially in winter, when bodies are palest. Salons with names like Eternal Summer and Tan City dot strip malls across the country, promising prettiness and, in some cases, better health, despite a growing body of evidence that links indoor tanning to skin cancer.

Which food companies don't use BPA-lined cans? There are many reasons to be concerned about the chemical bisphenol-A or BPA. The Food and Drug Administration says BPA is safe low levels, but other countries take a more cautious approach: Austria, Denmark, Belgium, France and China limit the chemical's contact with food. The FDA continues to study the issue. In response, several companies have removed BPA from their cans, and others have moved away from using it in the cans of specific foods. Here's a list of national brands that produce canned foods that do no have BPA in the lining:

Real American Idols. In the past year, we've lost four science and environment icons whose impact will be felt for decades.

Beauty products aim to prevent air pollution damage. Many people want younger looking skin and one of the ways to do that includes protecting it from sun damage, but now a slew of products are also claiming to protect skin from pollutants in the air.

Lung cancer rates in Welsh women increase by a third. The number of women in Wales with lung cancer has jumped by 35 per cent over the last decade and the country now has one of the highest rates in Europe, according to a report.

Ad banned over claim sunbeds don't raise cancer risk. A Scottish chain of tanning salons has been banned from producing adverts claiming there is no link between sunbeds and skin cancer.

Turkey's president accuses advocates of birth control of being traitors. He has called women unequal to men. He has demanded that some high school students learn an Ottoman-era script scrapped nearly a century ago. Now, he has described birth control as treasonous.

© EnvironmentalHealthNews 2003-2004

Warning: That tan could be hazardous. Indoor tanning might seem like a fashion that faded with the 1980s, but it remains a persistent part of American adolescence, popular spring, summer and fall but especially in winter, when bodies are palest. Salons with names like Eternal Summer and Tan City dot strip malls across the country, promising prettiness and, in some cases, better health, despite a growing body of evidence that links indoor tanning to skin cancer.

Which food companies don't use BPA-lined cans? There are many reasons to be concerned about the chemical bisphenol-A or BPA. The Food and Drug Administration says BPA is safe low levels, but other countries take a more cautious approach: Austria, Denmark, Belgium, France and China limit the chemical's contact with food. The FDA continues to study the issue. In response, several companies have removed BPA from their cans, and others have moved away from using it in the cans of specific foods. Here's a list of national brands that produce canned foods that do no have BPA in the lining:

Real American Idols. In the past year, we've lost four science and environment icons whose impact will be felt for decades.

Beauty products aim to prevent air pollution damage. Many people want younger looking skin and one of the ways to do that includes protecting it from sun damage, but now a slew of products are also claiming to protect skin from pollutants in the air.

Lung cancer rates in Welsh women increase by a third. The number of women in Wales with lung cancer has jumped by 35 per cent over the last decade and the country now has one of the highest rates in Europe, according to a report.

Ad banned over claim sunbeds don't raise cancer risk. A Scottish chain of tanning salons has been banned from producing adverts claiming there is no link between sunbeds and skin cancer.

Turkey's president accuses advocates of birth control of being traitors. He has called women unequal to men. He has demanded that some high school students learn an Ottoman-era script scrapped nearly a century ago. Now, he has described birth control as treasonous.

© EnvironmentalHealthNews 2003-2004

Warning: That tan could be hazardous. Indoor tanning might seem like a fashion that faded with the 1980s, but it remains a persistent part of American adolescence, popular spring, summer and fall but especially in winter, when bodies are palest. Salons with names like Eternal Summer and Tan City dot strip malls across the country, promising prettiness and, in some cases, better health, despite a growing body of evidence that links indoor tanning to skin cancer.

Which food companies don't use BPA-lined cans? There are many reasons to be concerned about the chemical bisphenol-A or BPA. The Food and Drug Administration says BPA is safe low levels, but other countries take a more cautious approach: Austria, Denmark, Belgium, France and China limit the chemical's contact with food. The FDA continues to study the issue. In response, several companies have removed BPA from their cans, and others have moved away from using it in the cans of specific foods. Here's a list of national brands that produce canned foods that do no have BPA in the lining:

Real American Idols. In the past year, we've lost four science and environment icons whose impact will be felt for decades.

Beauty products aim to prevent air pollution damage. Many people want younger looking skin and one of the ways to do that includes protecting it from sun damage, but now a slew of products are also claiming to protect skin from pollutants in the air.

Lung cancer rates in Welsh women increase by a third. The number of women in Wales with lung cancer has jumped by 35 per cent over the last decade and the country now has one of the highest rates in Europe, according to a report.

Ad banned over claim sunbeds don't raise cancer risk. A Scottish chain of tanning salons has been banned from producing adverts claiming there is no link between sunbeds and skin cancer.

Turkey's president accuses advocates of birth control of being traitors. He has called women unequal to men. He has demanded that some high school students learn an Ottoman-era script scrapped nearly a century ago. Now, he has described birth control as treasonous.

© EnvironmentalHealthNews 2003-2004

Ad banned over claim sunbeds don't raise cancer risk. A Scottish chain of tanning salons has been banned from producing adverts claiming there is no link between sunbeds and skin cancer.

Turkey's president accuses advocates of birth control of being traitors. He has called women unequal to men. He has demanded that some high school students learn an Ottoman-era script scrapped nearly a century ago. Now, he has described birth control as treasonous.

Jeans with cancer-causing azo dyes withdrawn nine months after first recall. In March the Herald Sun reported that major retailers had recalled clothing and bed linen colored with particular "azo dyes" known to break down into carcinogenic chemicals.

Safe water and basic sanitation would slash maternal deaths, report says. An estimated 289,000 women die from childbirth complications each year. The lives of new mothers and babies are being put at risk by an unreliable supply of safe water, lack of good hygiene and an inadequate number of toilets, according to a report published by a group of health organizations.

Another 3,234 reasons to avoid tanning beds. Everyone knows, or should know, by now that tanning beds expose users to a lot of ultraviolet radiation, which can cause cancer. But according to a new study released Monday, indoor tanning also is responsible for an average of 3,234 injuries that result in visits to hospital emergency rooms each year.

National Institutes of Health ends longitudinal children's study. The US National Institutes of Health has cancelled its plan for an ambitious, multi-decade study of environmental influences on children's health, agency director Francis Collins announced on 12 December.

Prenatal exposure to common chemicals linked to lower IQ in children. Two chemicals found in a number of common consumer products may be damaging to fetal development and could even lower children's IQs, according to a new study by researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health in New York City.

© EnvironmentalHealthNews 2003-2004

Ad banned over claim sunbeds don't raise cancer risk. A Scottish chain of tanning salons has been banned from producing adverts claiming there is no link between sunbeds and skin cancer.

Turkey's president accuses advocates of birth control of being traitors. He has called women unequal to men. He has demanded that some high school students learn an Ottoman-era script scrapped nearly a century ago. Now, he has described birth control as treasonous.

Jeans with cancer-causing azo dyes withdrawn nine months after first recall. In March the Herald Sun reported that major retailers had recalled clothing and bed linen colored with particular "azo dyes" known to break down into carcinogenic chemicals.

Safe water and basic sanitation would slash maternal deaths, report says. An estimated 289,000 women die from childbirth complications each year. The lives of new mothers and babies are being put at risk by an unreliable supply of safe water, lack of good hygiene and an inadequate number of toilets, according to a report published by a group of health organizations.

Another 3,234 reasons to avoid tanning beds. Everyone knows, or should know, by now that tanning beds expose users to a lot of ultraviolet radiation, which can cause cancer. But according to a new study released Monday, indoor tanning also is responsible for an average of 3,234 injuries that result in visits to hospital emergency rooms each year.

National Institutes of Health ends longitudinal children's study. The US National Institutes of Health has cancelled its plan for an ambitious, multi-decade study of environmental influences on children's health, agency director Francis Collins announced on 12 December.

Prenatal exposure to common chemicals linked to lower IQ in children. Two chemicals found in a number of common consumer products may be damaging to fetal development and could even lower children's IQs, according to a new study by researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health in New York City.

© EnvironmentalHealthNews 2003-2004

Ad banned over claim sunbeds don't raise cancer risk. A Scottish chain of tanning salons has been banned from producing adverts claiming there is no link between sunbeds and skin cancer.

Turkey's president accuses advocates of birth control of being traitors. He has called women unequal to men. He has demanded that some high school students learn an Ottoman-era script scrapped nearly a century ago. Now, he has described birth control as treasonous.

Jeans with cancer-causing azo dyes withdrawn nine months after first recall. In March the Herald Sun reported that major retailers had recalled clothing and bed linen colored with particular "azo dyes" known to break down into carcinogenic chemicals.

Safe water and basic sanitation would slash maternal deaths, report says. An estimated 289,000 women die from childbirth complications each year. The lives of new mothers and babies are being put at risk by an unreliable supply of safe water, lack of good hygiene and an inadequate number of toilets, according to a report published by a group of health organizations.

Another 3,234 reasons to avoid tanning beds. Everyone knows, or should know, by now that tanning beds expose users to a lot of ultraviolet radiation, which can cause cancer. But according to a new study released Monday, indoor tanning also is responsible for an average of 3,234 injuries that result in visits to hospital emergency rooms each year.

National Institutes of Health ends longitudinal children's study. The US National Institutes of Health has cancelled its plan for an ambitious, multi-decade study of environmental influences on children's health, agency director Francis Collins announced on 12 December.

Prenatal exposure to common chemicals linked to lower IQ in children. Two chemicals found in a number of common consumer products may be damaging to fetal development and could even lower children's IQs, according to a new study by researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health in New York City.

Children's EHN News

© EnvironmentalHealthNews 2003-2004

BPA alternative disrupts normal brain-cell growth, tied to hyperactivity, study says. In a groundbreaking study, researchers have shown why a chemical once thought to be a safe alternative to bisphenol-A, which was abandoned by manufacturers of baby bottles and sippy cups after a public outcry, might itself be more harmful than BPA.

Study suggests Wi-Fi exposure more dangerous to kids than previously thought. Even if we want to, we can't eliminate our exposure, or our children's, to RF/EMF. But, we may need to limit that exposure, when possible.

BPA and 'BPA-free' alternative linked to fetal brain changes. Fetal exposure to Bisphenol A, as well as to the widely marketed alternative Bisphenol S, may cause "real and measurable" changes in the development of a brain region that plays a key role in fear, impulse-control, obesity and early puberty.

Plastics chemical BPA linked to hyperactivity: Study. A University of Calgary study has found that a common ingredient in consumer products can cause hyperactivity in zebrafish.

Researchers advise pregnant women to limit exposure to receipts and plastic. Pregnant women are being warned to avoid reaching for credit card and cash register receipts as the ubiquitous bits of paper are increasingly seen as a threat to unborn children.

Replacement for BPA in plastics also suspect. A chemical thought to be a safe replacement for one banned for use in baby bottles also causes developmental issues in fish embryos, according to a study released on Monday.

After enterovirus 68 outbreak, a paralysis mystery. A nationwide outbreak of a respiratory virus last fall sent droves of children to emergency departments. The infections have now subsided, as researchers knew they would, but they have left behind a frightening mystery.

© EnvironmentalHealthNews 2003-2004

BPA alternative disrupts normal brain-cell growth, tied to hyperactivity, study says. In a groundbreaking study, researchers have shown why a chemical once thought to be a safe alternative to bisphenol-A, which was abandoned by manufacturers of baby bottles and sippy cups after a public outcry, might itself be more harmful than BPA.

Study suggests Wi-Fi exposure more dangerous to kids than previously thought. Even if we want to, we can't eliminate our exposure, or our children's, to RF/EMF. But, we may need to limit that exposure, when possible.

BPA and 'BPA-free' alternative linked to fetal brain changes. Fetal exposure to Bisphenol A, as well as to the widely marketed alternative Bisphenol S, may cause "real and measurable" changes in the development of a brain region that plays a key role in fear, impulse-control, obesity and early puberty.

Plastics chemical BPA linked to hyperactivity: Study. A University of Calgary study has found that a common ingredient in consumer products can cause hyperactivity in zebrafish.

Researchers advise pregnant women to limit exposure to receipts and plastic. Pregnant women are being warned to avoid reaching for credit card and cash register receipts as the ubiquitous bits of paper are increasingly seen as a threat to unborn children.

Replacement for BPA in plastics also suspect. A chemical thought to be a safe replacement for one banned for use in baby bottles also causes developmental issues in fish embryos, according to a study released on Monday.

After enterovirus 68 outbreak, a paralysis mystery. A nationwide outbreak of a respiratory virus last fall sent droves of children to emergency departments. The infections have now subsided, as researchers knew they would, but they have left behind a frightening mystery.

© EnvironmentalHealthNews 2003-2004

BPA alternative disrupts normal brain-cell growth, tied to hyperactivity, study says. In a groundbreaking study, researchers have shown why a chemical once thought to be a safe alternative to bisphenol-A, which was abandoned by manufacturers of baby bottles and sippy cups after a public outcry, might itself be more harmful than BPA.

Study suggests Wi-Fi exposure more dangerous to kids than previously thought. Even if we want to, we can't eliminate our exposure, or our children's, to RF/EMF. But, we may need to limit that exposure, when possible.

BPA and 'BPA-free' alternative linked to fetal brain changes. Fetal exposure to Bisphenol A, as well as to the widely marketed alternative Bisphenol S, may cause "real and measurable" changes in the development of a brain region that plays a key role in fear, impulse-control, obesity and early puberty.

Plastics chemical BPA linked to hyperactivity: Study. A University of Calgary study has found that a common ingredient in consumer products can cause hyperactivity in zebrafish.

Researchers advise pregnant women to limit exposure to receipts and plastic. Pregnant women are being warned to avoid reaching for credit card and cash register receipts as the ubiquitous bits of paper are increasingly seen as a threat to unborn children.

Replacement for BPA in plastics also suspect. A chemical thought to be a safe replacement for one banned for use in baby bottles also causes developmental issues in fish embryos, according to a study released on Monday.

After enterovirus 68 outbreak, a paralysis mystery. A nationwide outbreak of a respiratory virus last fall sent droves of children to emergency departments. The infections have now subsided, as researchers knew they would, but they have left behind a frightening mystery.

© EnvironmentalHealthNews 2003-2004

BPA alternative disrupts normal brain-cell growth, tied to hyperactivity, study says. In a groundbreaking study, researchers have shown why a chemical once thought to be a safe alternative to bisphenol-A, which was abandoned by manufacturers of baby bottles and sippy cups after a public outcry, might itself be more harmful than BPA.

Study suggests Wi-Fi exposure more dangerous to kids than previously thought. Even if we want to, we can't eliminate our exposure, or our children's, to RF/EMF. But, we may need to limit that exposure, when possible.

BPA and 'BPA-free' alternative linked to fetal brain changes. Fetal exposure to Bisphenol A, as well as to the widely marketed alternative Bisphenol S, may cause "real and measurable" changes in the development of a brain region that plays a key role in fear, impulse-control, obesity and early puberty.

Plastics chemical BPA linked to hyperactivity: Study. A University of Calgary study has found that a common ingredient in consumer products can cause hyperactivity in zebrafish.

Researchers advise pregnant women to limit exposure to receipts and plastic. Pregnant women are being warned to avoid reaching for credit card and cash register receipts as the ubiquitous bits of paper are increasingly seen as a threat to unborn children.

Replacement for BPA in plastics also suspect. A chemical thought to be a safe replacement for one banned for use in baby bottles also causes developmental issues in fish embryos, according to a study released on Monday.

After enterovirus 68 outbreak, a paralysis mystery. A nationwide outbreak of a respiratory virus last fall sent droves of children to emergency departments. The infections have now subsided, as researchers knew they would, but they have left behind a frightening mystery.

© EnvironmentalHealthNews 2003-2004

BPA alternative disrupts normal brain-cell growth, tied to hyperactivity, study says. In a groundbreaking study, researchers have shown why a chemical once thought to be a safe alternative to bisphenol-A, which was abandoned by manufacturers of baby bottles and sippy cups after a public outcry, might itself be more harmful than BPA.

Study suggests Wi-Fi exposure more dangerous to kids than previously thought. Even if we want to, we can't eliminate our exposure, or our children's, to RF/EMF. But, we may need to limit that exposure, when possible.

BPA and 'BPA-free' alternative linked to fetal brain changes. Fetal exposure to Bisphenol A, as well as to the widely marketed alternative Bisphenol S, may cause "real and measurable" changes in the development of a brain region that plays a key role in fear, impulse-control, obesity and early puberty.

Plastics chemical BPA linked to hyperactivity: Study. A University of Calgary study has found that a common ingredient in consumer products can cause hyperactivity in zebrafish.

Researchers advise pregnant women to limit exposure to receipts and plastic. Pregnant women are being warned to avoid reaching for credit card and cash register receipts as the ubiquitous bits of paper are increasingly seen as a threat to unborn children.

Replacement for BPA in plastics also suspect. A chemical thought to be a safe replacement for one banned for use in baby bottles also causes developmental issues in fish embryos, according to a study released on Monday.

After enterovirus 68 outbreak, a paralysis mystery. A nationwide outbreak of a respiratory virus last fall sent droves of children to emergency departments. The infections have now subsided, as researchers knew they would, but they have left behind a frightening mystery.

© EnvironmentalHealthNews 2003-2004

BPA alternative disrupts normal brain-cell growth, tied to hyperactivity, study says. In a groundbreaking study, researchers have shown why a chemical once thought to be a safe alternative to bisphenol-A, which was abandoned by manufacturers of baby bottles and sippy cups after a public outcry, might itself be more harmful than BPA.

Study suggests Wi-Fi exposure more dangerous to kids than previously thought. Even if we want to, we can't eliminate our exposure, or our children's, to RF/EMF. But, we may need to limit that exposure, when possible.

BPA and 'BPA-free' alternative linked to fetal brain changes. Fetal exposure to Bisphenol A, as well as to the widely marketed alternative Bisphenol S, may cause "real and measurable" changes in the development of a brain region that plays a key role in fear, impulse-control, obesity and early puberty.

Plastics chemical BPA linked to hyperactivity: Study. A University of Calgary study has found that a common ingredient in consumer products can cause hyperactivity in zebrafish.

Researchers advise pregnant women to limit exposure to receipts and plastic. Pregnant women are being warned to avoid reaching for credit card and cash register receipts as the ubiquitous bits of paper are increasingly seen as a threat to unborn children.

Replacement for BPA in plastics also suspect. A chemical thought to be a safe replacement for one banned for use in baby bottles also causes developmental issues in fish embryos, according to a study released on Monday.

After enterovirus 68 outbreak, a paralysis mystery. A nationwide outbreak of a respiratory virus last fall sent droves of children to emergency departments. The infections have now subsided, as researchers knew they would, but they have left behind a frightening mystery.

© EnvironmentalHealthNews 2003-2004

Two-thirds of cancers a matter of bad luck? Not so fast. "Two thirds of cancers are due to bad luck," or some variation of this, is the cancer-related headline of the moment. But this does not equal to saying that two-thirds of cancers are due to "bad luck."

Island of despair held hostage by climate change. The highest point on South Tarawa, the capital island of Kiribati, exists behind a wall of sandbags and rocks. It lies so close to the sea that one of the agile children who make up almost half the population could leap from the promontory and land in the water three metres below.

New Zealand fluoride critics slam law 'rush.' Anti-fluoride campaigners are alarmed at a "sinister" move to slide through a law change over Christmas, validating councils' power to add the chemical to drinking water.

New diet guidelines might reflect environment cost. For years, the government has been issuing guidelines about healthy eating choices. Now, a panel that advises the Agriculture Department is ready to recommend that you be told not only what foods are better for your own health, but for the environment as well.

Lead test for Sandy children. One in 15 people tested so far under a state superstorm Sandy project had elevated lead levels, according to state data.

Missing money in NJ lead fund. The New Jersey government left countless children exposed to lead poisoning in the last decade by diverting more than $50 million away from a health fund so routine state bills and salaries could be paid, an Asbury Park Press investigation found.

Unitarians try to create lasting change after W. Virginia water crisis. In the wake of the Freedom Industries leak that fouled the water of roughly 300,000 West Virginians nearly a year ago, the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Charleston called out to several hundred other UU chapters for help.

© EnvironmentalHealthNews 2003-2004

Two-thirds of cancers a matter of bad luck? Not so fast. "Two thirds of cancers are due to bad luck," or some variation of this, is the cancer-related headline of the moment. But this does not equal to saying that two-thirds of cancers are due to "bad luck."

Island of despair held hostage by climate change. The highest point on South Tarawa, the capital island of Kiribati, exists behind a wall of sandbags and rocks. It lies so close to the sea that one of the agile children who make up almost half the population could leap from the promontory and land in the water three metres below.

New Zealand fluoride critics slam law 'rush.' Anti-fluoride campaigners are alarmed at a "sinister" move to slide through a law change over Christmas, validating councils' power to add the chemical to drinking water.

New diet guidelines might reflect environment cost. For years, the government has been issuing guidelines about healthy eating choices. Now, a panel that advises the Agriculture Department is ready to recommend that you be told not only what foods are better for your own health, but for the environment as well.

Lead test for Sandy children. One in 15 people tested so far under a state superstorm Sandy project had elevated lead levels, according to state data.

Missing money in NJ lead fund. The New Jersey government left countless children exposed to lead poisoning in the last decade by diverting more than $50 million away from a health fund so routine state bills and salaries could be paid, an Asbury Park Press investigation found.

Unitarians try to create lasting change after W. Virginia water crisis. In the wake of the Freedom Industries leak that fouled the water of roughly 300,000 West Virginians nearly a year ago, the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Charleston called out to several hundred other UU chapters for help.

© EnvironmentalHealthNews 2003-2004

Two-thirds of cancers a matter of bad luck? Not so fast. "Two thirds of cancers are due to bad luck," or some variation of this, is the cancer-related headline of the moment. But this does not equal to saying that two-thirds of cancers are due to "bad luck."

Island of despair held hostage by climate change. The highest point on South Tarawa, the capital island of Kiribati, exists behind a wall of sandbags and rocks. It lies so close to the sea that one of the agile children who make up almost half the population could leap from the promontory and land in the water three metres below.

New Zealand fluoride critics slam law 'rush.' Anti-fluoride campaigners are alarmed at a "sinister" move to slide through a law change over Christmas, validating councils' power to add the chemical to drinking water.

New diet guidelines might reflect environment cost. For years, the government has been issuing guidelines about healthy eating choices. Now, a panel that advises the Agriculture Department is ready to recommend that you be told not only what foods are better for your own health, but for the environment as well.

Lead test for Sandy children. One in 15 people tested so far under a state superstorm Sandy project had elevated lead levels, according to state data.

Missing money in NJ lead fund. The New Jersey government left countless children exposed to lead poisoning in the last decade by diverting more than $50 million away from a health fund so routine state bills and salaries could be paid, an Asbury Park Press investigation found.

Unitarians try to create lasting change after W. Virginia water crisis. In the wake of the Freedom Industries leak that fouled the water of roughly 300,000 West Virginians nearly a year ago, the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Charleston called out to several hundred other UU chapters for help.

  

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